Music Premiere: Katy Guillen & The Drive’s new single “Set In Stone”

Music Premiere: Katy Guillen & The Drive’s new single “Set In Stone”

I’m Katy Guillen (pronounced Ghee-En), guitarist and one half of the duo Katy Guillen & The Drive along with drummer Stephanie Williams. We started playing and writing music as a duo in 2018 and worked on our home recording skills during COVID to release our first EP Dream Girl in 2020. We followed with our […]

The post Music Premiere: Katy Guillen & The Drive’s new single “Set In Stone” first appeared on Guitar Girl Magazine.

The post Music Premiere: Katy Guillen & The Drive’s new single “Set In Stone” appeared first on Guitar Girl Magazine.

How to Reamp Your Guitar

How to Reamp Your Guitar

[Originally published February 14, 2022]
Welcome to another Dojo! This time I’m going to show you how to reamp your guitar and explore some creative ways you can re-amps other tracks as well (soft synths, vocals, drums, etc.). In my earlier column “Why Guitarists Shouldn’t Diss DIs,” I mentioned the benefits of using a DI for creative recording. If you have a DI box, dust it off! You’ll need it when I show you how to get more out of your DI-recorded guitar and bass tracks by reamping them into your pedals and amps to capture new perspectives and even add some new reverberant spaces. Tighten up your belts, the Dojo is now open.


To begin, you’re going to need a reamp box such as the Radial JCR Studio Reamper ($229 street) and most likely a TRS-to-male XLR cable (like the Hosa HSX-003, $11 street). I like passive re-amp boxes because they don’t require external power and are easy to move around. Some would argue that passive models loose signal strength, which is true, but how many boost/overdrive pedals do we guitarists have? At least one, right? Put one after the reamp box and before your amp. Boom. Problem solved, and you can drive your amp even harder. Otherwise, you’re going to shell out more dinero for active reamp boxes, which isn’t really necessary, and I like the inherent lo-fi nature of this process.

Reamping is a two-part endeavor. The first part involves using a DI box to record the guitar directly into your DAW. If you’re unsure how to do this, I recommend going online and reading my Dojo article mentioned above. It’s very easy and straightforward. The second part involves routing the DI-recorded guitar track out of your DAW and into your reamp pedal. Depending on your interface, you might need the TRS-to-male XLR cable previously mentioned.

Look at Fig. 1 and do the following: Plug the XLR end of the cable from your audio interface’s out into the input of your reamp box. Now use your regular guitar cable and connect the output of your reamp box to the input of your amp. Place a microphone in front of your guitar amp, plug that into your interface, and record-enable that track. When you hit playback, the DI track will play back through your amp, and you will be recording the amp. You’re now re-amping! You can make new recordings each time you change amp settings or mic positions.

For even more craziness, check out Fig. 2. You can add any (and all) pedals (even entire pedalboards) into the signal chain. Get creative. But wait, there’s more!

You can also route any track’s output in your DAW to your reamp box and really start going berserk. Try your lead vocal, the background vocals, keys, and drums (especially drum machines) and listen to how it sounds. Reamping also gives you the ability to manually tweak pedal knobs and make dynamic parts that are really changing as the track plays. Try playing with the times and feedback amount of your delays. Fun!

Finally, depending on how much you are driving your amp, you could keep it clean, move the mic further away from the speaker, and start capturing more of the sound of your room. I like to do this on drum machines. It puts them in a real space. Specifically, your space. No reverb plug-in can get that! As always, I invite you to come by my website to hear and see these concepts in action. Until next time, namaste.

Tips And Advice On How To Successfully Learn Guitar

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Learning how to play the guitar is a few people wish to learn. That is the purpose behind this piece.The following paragraphs contain advice that can help you start the guitar. Spend time on the fundamentals. A toddler doesn’t start running right away; they have to figure out how to walk first. You might want […]

Take Your Time So You Can Learn To Play Guitar

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Do you play a musical instrument? Do you want to learn how to play a guitar? You can play guitar if you’re willing to practice and use these tips. Read on to learn how to go about playing the guitar. Don’t feel like you need to learn it all at once. A steady pace will […]

Pedalboard Options for Your Acoustic Guitar

Whether you’re a professional player, weekend warrior, or a once-in-a-blue-moon open miker, you will likely be put in a position to play both electric and acoustic instruments on a gig. As you’re looking to build your switch-hitting pedalboard, you may find that electric and acoustic guitar processing haven’t exactly been treated equitably in the marketplace. Even a bog-standard electric guitar rig these days is populated with three overdrives du jour and a gaggle of space-age DSP-driven effects culled from a market saturated with bobs and bits intended to fatten your sound and thin your wallet. When compared to the smorgasbord of electric guitar processing products, the selection of acoustic-guitar-specific offerings may seem a bit spartan.


But flattop pickers need not be forlorn! I’ve had the opportunity to build lots of guitar rigs for players who needed to serve both the electric and acoustic parts of a setlist, and there are many options for getting your acoustic signal out of your instrument and into the PA. Some of these builds were biased toward the electric side of things, when acoustic playing was just a small part of the job description, and others were mostly acoustic-minded affairs with just a sprinkling of electric-centric equipment. You’ll need to look at your situation to determine how much board real estate and budget resources you should be allocating to your double-minded setup.

The simplest way to get your acoustic instrument’s sound to the PA is to add a plain old DI to your board. I’d highly recommend the transformer-isolated variety, like the Radial ProDI ($114 street) or, if you can spring for it, something like their J48 ($229 street), which includes a higher-quality Jensen transformer. You can stick this DI to your board with a permanently connected guitar cable and simply plug in your acoustic when you need it. Neutrik silentPLUGs ($12 street) will help you avoid those nasty connecting/disconnecting pops as you transition from electric to acoustic by automatically muting the unused signal chain.

If you wind up sharing effects between acoustic and electric, be cautious about the settings of your overdrives and distortion pedals.

Maybe you’d like to have only one instrument cable into your rig? Put a simple A/B switch in front of your first electric pedal and the DI. Whenever you select your DI, the electric chain will be muted. Turn off the effects in your electric chain, particularly overdrives and distortions, to keep the white noise from the deselected backline amp at a minimum. Switching the A/B selector back to the electric will effectively mute the DI output to front-of-house. You’ll need to be careful here as you can accidentally send electric guitar to FOH or acoustic guitar to your backline amp if you lose track of the state of your A/B switch. You can alter this arrangement by putting additional effects after the A/B switch and in front of your DI or sharing effects in both chains by putting your A/B switch after your electric-guitar effects. If you wind up sharing effects between acoustic and electric, be cautious about the settings of your overdrives and distortion pedals. Accidentally engaging one could lead to some surprising—and painfully loud—results. The line between exciting and execrable can be very thin.

If you want to go beyond the straight piezo-pickup sound of your acoustic, consider acoustic imaging. You can replace your simple DI with something like Fishman’s Aura Spectrum ($399 street) or LR Baggs’ Voiceprint ($399 street), which use impulse responses (IRs) and DSP to produce realistic miked and in-the-room sounds from a humble undersaddle bridge pickup. Alternatively, if your rig already contains something like the Line 6 HX Stomp ($649 street), you can use it to process and route your acoustic signal. Several purveyors produce acoustic IRs that you can load as effect blocks on your Stomp (3 Sigma Audio and Worship Tutorials are two). You can then use your Stomp’s FX send port to connect it to a plain external DI and configure your specific electric and acoustic presets so they output to the correct port. An additional benefit to this type of setup is that you have access to all the HX Stomp effects as well, so compression, modulation, delay, and reverb are readily available for your acoustic processing needs.

Whether you connect your acoustic instrument to the PA via a run-of-the-mill DI or the latest in high-tech signal processing, there are many ways to sound great in our amplified world. Don’t let your electrics have all the fun, bring acoustic signal processing into your pedalboard world!

SOURCE Nashville Hall of Fame 2022 Inductees Honored at May Luncheon Moderated by Devon O’Day – “Women Behind The Music”

SOURCE Nashville Hall of Fame 2022 Inductees Honored at May Luncheon Moderated by Devon O’Day – “Women Behind The Music”

Nashville, TN (May 19, 2022) – SOURCE Nashville held its monthly luncheon at Maggiano’s in Nashville on May 19, 2022 and celebrated seven prominent female industry leaders who will be inducted into the SOURCE NASHVILLE HALL OF FAME on Tuesday, August 23, 2022. The luncheon was moderated by Devon O’Day, host of the streaming show, “Main Street […]

The post SOURCE Nashville Hall of Fame 2022 Inductees Honored at May Luncheon Moderated by Devon O’Day – “Women Behind The Music” first appeared on Guitar Girl Magazine.

The post SOURCE Nashville Hall of Fame 2022 Inductees Honored at May Luncheon Moderated by Devon O’Day – “Women Behind The Music” appeared first on Guitar Girl Magazine.

Rethinking the Blues Scale

Rethinking the Blues Scale

Last updated on May 21, 2022

Don’t get me wrong, I’m all for blues music, but the blues scale can yield beguiling musical results that bear little resemblance to the traditional blues—particularly if one looks at (and listens to) the scale from a different point of view.


Chord Creation

The idea of harmonization is relatively simple. It means is to play two or more notes together at the same time. Technically speaking, two notes performed at the same time create a dyad, not a chord. It takes three or more notes performed simultaneously to create a chord, although the one exception, the two-note so-called “power chord” in Ex. 1, skews this theory a bit.

So, which two or more notes should you harmonize? Any you want! But, if you desire continuity in your compositions and playing, it’s a good idea to harmonize notes from a specific scale.

Most musicians usually start with the major scale, stacking every other note of the scale on top of each other until a triad is created (Ex. 2).

From there you can start adding, or replacing notes, to create variations from these basic triads, as seen in Ex. 3.

I must point out that you can also arpeggiate these chords, playing the notes one at a time (Ex. 4). Since we are emphasizing harmony in this lesson, it helps to let them ring out.

That’s the most common way to create chords, but in this lesson we’re looking for something unusual. So rather than being so formulaic, let’s proceed with the basic idea that playing two or more notes at the same time will work as long as they all come from the blues scale.

The blues scale is just the minor pentatonic scale with one additional note, which gets labeled #4 or a b5 depending on context. Ex. 5 shows the most common “box” pattern for the A blues scale (A–C–D–Eb–E–G). After getting a hold of this scale, I recommend working on it in the key of E and D since many of the notes can be played with open strings.

There are two considerable disparities when it comes to generating chords from the blues scale as compared to the major scale. First, the blues scale only has six notes and second, the intervals between the notes in each scale are significantly different.

This means that the blues scale creates radical changes in chord construction and nomenclature, the theory of which is far beyond the scope of this lesson. For instance, Ex. 6 is a selection of relatively common chords you can generate from the A blues scale. Later on, we will get into more exotic harmonies.

For now, all you really need to understand about the theory is that, the chords, and the melodies I’ve composed to fit them, all come from harmonizing notes from the A blues scale.

When Theory, Intuition, and Creativity Meet

Once the concept of harmonization is understood, the possibilities are limited only by your imagination. The following examples are just a few of the endless ideas you could generate. I have designed my examples to imitate the styles of well-known composers and guitarists and broken them down into how they are fingered on the fretboard.

Ex. 7 is a particularly fun place to start as this arpeggio is just the A blues scale, but the notes are displaced into different octaves to create chords.

For Ex. 8 I’ve rearranged the notes ever so slightly to create a slightly more uniform, pseudo-Slayer progression and melody.

Ex. 8

The bent note at the beginning of Ex. 9 immediately made me think of Jimmy Page, so for guitar two, I mimicked Robert Plant’s chromatic vocal melody on “Misty Mountain Hop” to create this Led Zeppelin-inspired etude. Note that the first chord is labeled A5(#11) because it contains the D# almost an octave and half higher than the root, making it a #11 in relationship to the A.

Ex. 9

Ex. 10 was a happy accident I discovered while playing around with this lesson’s concept. It’s unashamedly Nine Inch Nails meets Andy Summers. The second chord in the progression is a little tricky to label, so I went with D5(b9) as it contains Eb an octave and one half-step away from the root, making it the b9.

Ex. 10

Ex. 11 demonstrates the power of playing unexpected, three-note chords over a static bassline, very similar to funk/fusion keyboard players in the 1970s (think Herbie Hancock and Chick Corea). To provide continuity, I’ve actually harmonized the blues scale using the same method discussed in Ex. 2. The chord labels I’ve chosen are derived from a combination of the chords and the bass line, though you’ll see there are really only two chords: Cm and Asus4, played with different voicings. And take my word for it, the fact that this progression contains both Cm and Am chords is highly unusual and worth more investigation.

Ex. 11

Ex. 12 Is a pseudo-power chord riff a la Fugazi or other bands found in the post-punk/emo genres. I’ve started here with a variation of the A5(#11) chord. Perhaps this is the defining chord of the harmonized blues scale? The rest of the progression seems to alternate between variations of Am and G, but notice that the bass is playing different notes over the chords, providing harmonic variation. Also pay attention that B and C sections are slightly different.

Ex. 12

Comprehend and Create!

I hope by now you’ve realized that the key to exploiting the harmonized blues scale is to include the #4/b5 in all your progressions. This is the vital element that distinguishes the blues scale from so many others. Make your own progressions, melodies, and songs based on what we’ve started here. You are only limited by your imagination.


paris jackson DEBUTS NEW SOUND WITH “lighthouse” PAYS HOMAGE TO NIRVANA’S “SLIVER” IN NEW VIDEO OUT NOW

paris jackson DEBUTS NEW SOUND WITH “lighthouse” PAYS HOMAGE TO NIRVANA’S “SLIVER” IN NEW VIDEO OUT NOW

NEW YORK, NY – May 20, 2022 – Today, singer, songwriter, multi-instrumentalist, actress, and activist paris jackson unveils her brand new single entitled “lighthouse” out now via Republic Records—listen to “lighthouse”HERE. “lighthouse” was produced by singer, songwriter, musician, and producer Butch Walker. The single is released alongside the official music video, which was inspired by the iconic video for […]

The post paris jackson DEBUTS NEW SOUND WITH “lighthouse” PAYS HOMAGE TO NIRVANA’S “SLIVER” IN NEW VIDEO OUT NOW first appeared on Guitar Girl Magazine.

The post paris jackson DEBUTS NEW SOUND WITH “lighthouse” PAYS HOMAGE TO NIRVANA’S “SLIVER” IN NEW VIDEO OUT NOW appeared first on Guitar Girl Magazine.

Learning Guitar: Want To Know It All? Read This Now!

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The guitar is far-reaching; it has miraculous inspirational powers. Keep reading to get some great tips on mastering one of the world’s best-loved musical instrument. Start with the basics. You must start with small steps. Even though you may wish to play your favorite songs now, you must learn the basics at the outset. Also, […]

070 SHAKE ENLISTS CHRISTINE AND THE QUEENS FOR NEW SINGLE ‘BODY’ + ‘YOU CAN’T KILL ME’ DUE JUNE 3RD VIA G.O.O.D. MUSIC / DEF JAM RECORDINGS

070 SHAKE ENLISTS CHRISTINE AND THE QUEENS FOR NEW SINGLE ‘BODY’ + ‘YOU CAN’T KILL ME’ DUE JUNE 3RD VIA G.O.O.D

(May 20, 2022) – 070 Shake shares the new song “Body” featuring Christine and the Queens, produced by David Andrew Sitek and Mike Dean, who also mixed and mastered the track from her highly-anticipated sophomore album YOU CAN’T KILL ME, due June 3rd via G.O.O.D. Music/Def Jam Recordings. For a glimpse into how electric her YOU CAN’T KILL ME Tour has been, 070 Shake recently […]

The post 070 SHAKE ENLISTS CHRISTINE AND THE QUEENS FOR NEW SINGLE ‘BODY’ + ‘YOU CAN’T KILL ME’ DUE JUNE 3RD VIA G.O.O.D. MUSIC / DEF JAM RECORDINGS first appeared on Guitar Girl Magazine.

The post 070 SHAKE ENLISTS CHRISTINE AND THE QUEENS FOR NEW SINGLE ‘BODY’ + ‘YOU CAN’T KILL ME’ DUE JUNE 3RD VIA G.O.O.D. MUSIC / DEF JAM RECORDINGS appeared first on Guitar Girl Magazine.